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Vacation!

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The flurry of blog activity yesterday will be in stark contrast to the next couples weeks in which I don’t think I’ll be posting at all. I will try to keep going on Instagram if cell service allows. I do have more to post about how I’ve packed foods for the trip, but it will have to wait until I get back. Woot!

Redecorating Adventures

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Another home project down! Sneaking this one in before vacation. Part of me is really, really happy about this project and another part is disappointed. I’ll break it down: I love the paint, love the wall stuffs rearranging and love that we finished (the bulk of) it before vacation. I’m disappointed that I rushed a bit (therefore didn’t stick to my “non-consumer” values) and bought some crappy rush materials. But did I mention the bathroom is beautiful and (99%) functional for us both right before and upon return from our vacation? Cause that really is the best part.

Our sad little bathroom has been in need of an update. It’s our only bathroom and it was so boring – all white with no excitement. The previous owner had updated this bathroom in 2001 (we have the receipts – she kept great records!) and added a great vanity and the cute white wall cabinet, but the room needs our own personality added to it. Plus it lacks a bit of function. The vanity is great for storing toilet paper and small appliances, but the wall cabinets, while cute, don’t give us tall enough shelves for what we need.

Here are some before pictures of our tiny white bathroom:

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Before

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Before!

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Before

We got colorful towels when we moved in to try to give something interesting to the room, but this weekend I finally reached my breaking point and decided it was time to get it a makeover. Redecorating presents an unique set of challenges now that I’m trying to reduce consumption. When it comes to supplies needed and accessories wanted to finish the room, I can’t just go out and get everything I want if I’m going to stay true to my new mantra. But this bathroom really needed new paint and something to make it feel more functional in the small space. There’s got to be a happy medium between consumption and doing nothing!

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Still needs a little “styling” but at least it is functional!

There is a happy medium and I think it is just called being more resourceful. Here’s how I approached all the things I needed in order to pull off this “new” room:

    • Wall Paint: Did you know you can remix paint? You can take paint back to the store and have them mix it into another color for you! There are limitations, though. I didn’t know about the limits before this project, so I didn’t get to recycle my old paint, but I know the limits now so I can next time! The color you are remixing has to be similar to the color you want, both in terms of hue and saturation. I think this would be really helpful if you had a whole lot of different “beige” tones and you combined them into one consistent color with the help of a little new tint and the mixing machine. I tried to take one gallon of leftover blue paint from a project and turn it into one gallon of dark purple paint for this project. You can’t go that far apparently! The guy at the store said he’s not a magician. BUT he did give me a discount on a new gallon of a paint! I hate having leftover paint because I do get the no-VOC line of whatever I can. My go-to brand is Yolo Colorhouse (local to the Pacific NW!) but they have limited colors, so I have used Benjamin Moore’s Natura line in our master (Paladian blue) and now our bathroom (Fire and Ice purple).
      • Total cost: $48 and a contribution to a corporate paint company who may have questionable morals.
      • Score on this one: consumed.
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Still space for some future projects!

  • Ceiling Paint: reused from another project. I really wanted a high gloss finish for the bathroom ceiling, but we already had white flat paint so… I’m probably the only one who notices anyway!
    • Total cost: $0
    • Score: balanced.
  • Paint supplies: I had all the supplies I needed to paint the room since we had painted almost the whole house already. I had rollers, brushes, etc. I didn’t have a paint tray, though. I substituted a pieces of aluminum foil for the tray. It worked out pretty well! I had to add more paint every half dozen rolls or so, since it didn’t have much capacity, but at least I could use my roller!
    • Total cost: $6 (I did buy a new roller and paint tape)
    • Score: balanced.
  • Mirror: Reused from another place in the house (was stored in the garage).
    • Total cost: $0
    • Score: not consumed!
  • Mirror frame (phase 2): I’ll make a frame out of pieces of lath or model wood, we’ll see when we get to phase two (probably later in July). For now, no cost or score.
  • Shelves: Ugh, here’s my mega disappointment.So, I was all set to make some shelves out of scrap wood. I have a miter saw to cut the wood and I even bought a new blade with more teeth for better cuts. But then I totally broke the saw in the process of changing the blade. I’m sure it is fine, but someone with better expertise than mine is going to have to put that thing back together if the safety guard is ever going to work properly again. Bummer. This was right before July 4th and we were having friends over, plus we’re about to leave for vacation and this is the last thing I want lingering (why did I start this again?). So I gave in – I ordered crappy shelves from Home Depot and installed them quickly. Now they totally suck and I’m going to have to buy shelf brackets to make them functional (they’re floating shelves but gravity is making an attempt at shaming their namesake). Sigh. At least they do hold minimal supplies for now, so the upgrade can wait until our return. Double sigh.
    • Total cost: $46 and a bit of my dignity, plus whatever the cost is going to be for brackets to hold up these sad, cheap Home Depot shelves (why do I keep buying stuff from there?!?)
    • Score: consumed
  • Towel Hooks: cheap single hooks from Amazon. ‘Course we already had the colorful towels. Part of me wants to go back to all white towels now, but I kind of like all the color against the purple walls!
    • Total cost: $12
    • Score: consumed (but I bought them a couple months ago so that counts for a middle ground somehow, right?)
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Hooks and frames – purchased months ago so they don’t count…. right?

  • Picture frames: frames I had impulse purchased a couple months ago from IKEA. I had to print the pictures.
    • Total cost: I don’t remember… $10 a frame? IKEA prices, you know.
    • Score: ugh, yes, I consumed again! But again, I bought these a few months ago too so they don’t count, right?
  • Jars: I’ve been keeping the glass jars that some of our food comes in – tomato sauce, honey, applesauce, etc. I used extra paint from another project to paint the inside of some of the jars. Other jars I collected from around the house. I put some paint in a couple jars to make them look Pinterest cool. An old honey jar now stores our toothbrushes. And I still have so many random jars to use!
    • Total cost: Free, with the purchase of food
    • Score: not consumed!

 

That’s two solid consumes, two balanced, two sorta forced balanced because I bought things months ago and abandoned them but eventually used them, and two not consumed. Hey, that’s not as bad as I thought! I’m now going to call this a quasi-success in my first attempt to redecorate without consumption. I bet I’ll get a lot better at this as time goes on!

Today

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Everything goes wrong the day before vacation, right? So far today:

  • Realized I don’t have everything I need to make some things I MUST freeze this morning, so I need to go to the store again.
  • The car battery died 40 minutes before my son’s doctor’s appointment (with a new doctor, who I really wanted to see before vacation).
  • The computer charger stopped working, so our only personal computer is out of commission.
  • The meat for the stew I want to make is still frozen (ironic, considering I need to half cook it and get it frozen solid again before we leave).
  • There was a shooting across the street from my son’s school (where he’s in a morning “hang out” camp) and he was on “lock down” for two hours.

Due to that last one it’s now mid-afternoon and I am super behind! (The kids in the school are okay. There was an incident in a house across the street from the school so the building went into lock down. I was following the details in order to gauge when the authorities might let us have our children, but once I found out they were evacuating I stopped caring about the story. I grabbed my child and got out of there! I’m sure Mr. Handsome will keep me posted on any details of the event, should they be released.)

But, I think, maybe, I need to slow down a bit. I’m trying to be super prepared for this vacation so everyone is happy and nothing goes wrong… but I have to remind myself that things will probably go wrong, and there will probably be times of “emergency” like if we don’t have buns for hot dogs or something. I have to remind myself along the way that these are not true emergencies.

If I don’t finish making these last couple things, there will always be food along the way. It may not be perfect food, but it will not be the end of the world. I’m going to try to scale back these last few hours of prep time and remember why we do these family vacations in the first place: to be with our family and have fun.

 

Garden Update: Hail Recovery and Pest Control

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More on the adventures in our garden! Things have been recovering nicely since the wicked hail storm a couple weeks ago.

Seeds that I had planted before the storm are sprouting nicely. These pictures I took are awful but I’m out of light now! Anyway, lots of alfalfa:

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Looks ready to eat!

Onions:

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They’re tiny but they’re there!

Carrots:

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Not as many seeds survived, but carrots do germinate slowly so maybe we’ll get more?

The tomatoes are flowering and there are tons of little green tomatoes coming out! I see the speckled trucks, though, and I wonder if they’re lacking nutrients. Last week I sprinkled crushed egg shells into the soil all around the garden (although I’ve read that it takes a really long time – a season? – for the shells to get much calcium into the soil) and today I gave them some epsom salts. Hopefully that will nutrient them up.

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Future tomato sauce

The broccoli is also flowering, unfortunately. We’ve had a couple hot days and of course I planted it too late in the season so it is bolting. I want some of it to bolt because I really want to get into seed saving… but I’m not sure if I’m ready! I need to do more research on it but when is there time? I’m trying to do too much right now as it is!

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Purple broccoli!

Other things going on in the garden…. the green caterpillars who were eating my kale, romaine, and chard that I wrote about last time haven’t been spotted in awhile. Although today I was watering the chard and spotted a dead white moth. It didn’t look like it was green caterpillar because I didn’t see a green body, but it still freaked me out a little. I haven’t been as diligent with my daily inspections for bugs, so I need to stop rushing through the morning garden chores!

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So pretty!

We’ve had other bugs – red shouldered or box elder bugs. Apparently they are harmless but they love to annoy us when we’re outside. I have looked for ways to move them along without killing them, but I didn’t have much luck. Mr. Handsome just got a play structure for the kiddos, which the bugs seem to love, so we really don’t have much choice but to spray these guys out of our yard.

Of course I don’t want to use chemicals, though, because we use the yard a lot! I found a solution – water and a bit of dish soap (I use Seventh Generation right now, but I thought about using Castille soap). Yesterday I sprayed their favorite spots a few times throughout the day, and today their numbers are vastly reduced. Apparently these guys are suseptable to drowning, so you have to get them pretty wet. If the water doesn’t kill them, the soap will deteriorate their exoskeleton and get them eventually. Poor little guys. Just move out of my yard!

Baby2 enjoyed helping in the garden last night while I pulled weeds and took pictures. Such a good helper!

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My helper

Traveling with Clean Food, Part 2: Planning

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This part has really stressed me out! It is pretty much why I haven’t posted in over a week. This, and the holiday weekend, a little extra work stuff going on, and generally trying to prepare for this vacation. Preparing for a road trip is more stressful than I thought! It isn’t like a “stationary” vacation where you’re in the same place for several days/nights and can be kind of flexible with what you do. No, we’ll be on the road every day and in a new place each night, so I have to think about where we’re going to stay each day, the route we’ll take, what we want to see and how much time we want to spend on the road, making sure we’re traveling at the right time of day, making sure everyone gets showers and clothes washed consistently, and, of course, the food.

Oh, the food! It is hard enough to plan a weekly menu for the family and we aren’t on the road every day! I hardly feel I’m qualified to give any advice whatsoever on this subject, but this blog isn’t advice it’s documentation, so here we go…

I started with pre-planning: knowing we’ll have opportunity to cook food while we’re at a camping spot or even hanging out at a friend’s house, wanting to bring lots of snacks to keep us from stopping for junk food, knowing I need to look for spots along the way to replenish supplies and looking out for good restaurants.

Cooking Our Own Food

The biggest challenge with this one came when I realized that I cannot take 9 days’ worth of meat with me in a cooler and expect it to stay “good” the whole time. Apparently this is an unrealistic expectation. So, I have planned on fresh, home-brought food lasting about three days, meat included. Of course that is stopping for fresh ice every day and being careful about how we pack the cooler, so longer-term storage is separate from short-term stuff like snacks (and we must keep meats separate from fresh veggies and dairy!).

As far as what we’ll cook, we have a few camping favorites: hot dogs and sausages cooked over campfire, bacon and eggs in the cast iron, s’mores, beef stew in the cast iron, etc. I’m making our bacon ahead of time, and the stew – advanced prep saves many a headache at the campsite! I don’t want to be slaving over a meal on vacation – I either want to  be actively participating in cooking with everyone (such as roasting dogs over the fire) or have food cooking while we’re setting up camp or playing a game.

When we aren’t camping, we’re probably staying with friends. We only have two hotel stays in eight nights! So when we’re with friends we’ll either be going out or they’ll be cooking for us. I’m really excited to see what they’ll cook… and to see if we’ll all try it (yes, myself included). I plan on bringing some food gifts for each of our hosts; I’d feel like I’m totally mooching otherwise. I thought about bringing some meat for our hosts from our freezer, but then I thought that might be weird… I’m settling for wine/beer, fresh herbs (that I’ll pick up at markets along the way) and any other cool things we find along the way (we’re making lots of interesting stops).

Storing Food

Cold stuff – coolers. We have three coolers and we’ll for sure use them all. One will be our all-purpose: condiments (kept in a small box that can be quickly removed at meals), cold snack storage, eggs, dairy, veggies. The second is for meat. We aren’t bringing any raw meat but I don’t want to take risks. Plus the meat has to be stored long-term so this way the number of times we need to open it will be really limited. The third cooler is for the day’s snacks and probably lunch. The purpose of the third cooler is to, again, limit the opening of the coolers that need to store cold food longer. We’ve never camped more than two nights, so I have no idea how this will work, but we’re giving it a shot!

Dry stuff – I’m using a Rubbermaid tub for dry storage. I am bringing some snack items that should last the trip (if we don’t eat them first) like granola, homemade kale chips, dehydrated banana chips, raisins, peanuts (Mr. Handsome loves them), and these blue corn tortillas we’ve been enjoying lately.

Not edible but food-related are supplies, like spatulas, tongs, utensils, etc. I’m storing just about everything, except for the cast iron dutch oven, in one of those 3-drawer plastic containers. We’re also going to try to store our clothes this way.

Getting More Food

After three days, we’re going to need to replenish supplies! It has taken us awhile to find all the places around our home that we can buy farm-fresh products, so how are we supposed to find good food on the go? This thought has stressed me out, too! But, I found some cool tools. My favorite is a website called Local Harvest (www.localharvest.org). It lists places near a location you specify such as farms with CSAs and produce stands, local farmers markets and even (sometimes) local grocery stores. I found a store in Jackson, WY that I am excited to try (it’s Jackson Whole Grocer).

I’ve taken the presence of even Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods for granted because almost all the cities we’re traveling to on our route do not have these stores. I thought these were going to be my back-ups, but they aren’t. Instead, I’m just planning carefully. Tomorrow (Monday) I’ll call the three farms I’d like to visit to make sure the hours listed on Local Harvest are still valid. I have also visited the websites for a couple farmers markets to make sure they’re still going on. I know going to a farmers market is still a gamble – there could be little selection both in terms or variety and quantity, but it’s a risk I’m willing to take. In a couple towns I have found a “back up” natural grocery so I think we’ll be okay.

If farms and local grocers fail me, there’s always a normal supermarket. We may not find everything I want us to (and a whole bunch of stuff I don’t want!) but we won’t starve. And THAT is what I need to keep in mind when I inevitably freak out about something with food. My goal for this trip is to stay calm and enjoy my family! Anyway, I’m getting side-tracked. Moving on.

Good Restaurants

Because nobody wants to cook everything or force others to cook for them against their will (I won’t make my friends cook if they’d rather go out!), there are restaurants. We are eating at some. On Day 2 we’ll be stopping for lunch in Coeur d’ Alene, Idaho, hopefully at a spot called Dockside which I read has an amazing view of the beautiful lake. I would like to think that even though I am asking for relatively strict diet changes, I can be flexible when it comes to things like eating out. I have a couple meals out planned, but if we’re hosted by a family I don’t make plans, I just follow their lead! Again, super excited to see what that brings, especially with friends we haven’t seen in awhile!

Okay, so coming back to plans on paper. I meal plan every week and this trip has been no exception. I have made my menu template just like I always do. This time I made two weeks worth of sheets since we’ll be gone for 9 days and they spread over two weeks (I mean, I still need to plan for what we’re eating before we leave and after we get back!*). I have added a couple things, like equipment needed for camping meals and notes about when to pack the cooler, stop for ice, stop for supplies, etc. But overall it is exactly the same!

I have the pages all ready and they are helping me figure out what to pack and what to prepare tomorrow, which is my great pre-cooking day. I’m making a bunch of bacon, the beef stew, lunch for our first day on the road and some snacks. Want the full list?

Snacks – dry

  • Kale chips (I bought a couple bunches at the farmers market and harvested just about everything I could from the garden. I have about three gallons of mason jars full of chips!)
  • Dehydrated banana chips (small batch though)
  • Peanuts and almonds (not paleo, but we aren’t strict)
  • Granola (Bob’s Red Mill Apple Blueberry)
  • Granola Bars (We still use Quaker Chewy which I know are totally processed and sugar but we haven’t had time to get comfy with a diy recipe yet so here we are)
  • Peanut butter
  • Bananas (first day only I think)

Snacks – cold

  • Cheese
  • Carrots
  • Apples
  • Pitas and Tortillas (also for meals)
  • Jam
  • Grapes
  • Muffins and Cookies – frozen, will transfer to dry storage after a few days (if not gone by then, of course)

Breakfast foods (camping breakfast needed on days two, day five, and day eight)

  • Of course I’m bringing lemons and my tea kettle for morning lemon water, and tea
  • Pre-made bacon (day two only)
  • Eggs (day two only unless we can find some at the market on day four)
  • Fruit – bananas, apples, grapes, melon
  • Granola
  • Oatmeal (we’ve got boiling water and bowls!)
  • No toast this time around!

Lunch foods (road lunch on days one, three, four, five, seven, eight, nine – so, like, almost every day; otherwise, we’ll eat out) – lunch seems to be the hardest meal for me to break out of the “grain” mold!

  • Wraps: ham lunch meat or leftover meat from dinner, lettuce, cheese, maybe a salad dressing if you’re Mr. Handsome. (I’ll make these in advance for a picnic on day 1, maybe even with some pre-cooked bacon that I didn’t need!)
  • Pita PB&J: Kiddo1 loves these, thank goodness. He’d probably eat them five times a day, though.
  • Leftovers: we’ll have leftover beef stew for lunch in Yellowstone on day five.
  • Hopefully farm fresh foods on day seven in Idaho. Lunch always goes best with something fresh! Carrots, apples, salad, sweet peas, etc.

Dinner foods (camping days one, four, seven; friends days two, three, six; out/hotel/clean out cooler days five and eight)

  • Sausages and hot dogs over campfire on day one (Kiddo1 loves this interactive camping meal), with salad still fresh from our garden.
  • Beef stew in cast iron Dutch Oven over propane grill at campsite on day four.
  • OMG totally winging it on day seven because I have no idea what food we’ll find by then (holy food gods let us find some decent meat!)
  • Friends: leaving it up to them (if all else fails we’ll find a place on Yelp!)
  • The clean out cooler days are self-explanatory, right? It’s a day to use leftovers and, if there aren’t any, indulge in local cuisine.

I think that just about covers it! I’d love to write about packing tomorrow, assuming I’m not too tired I will do it! Otherwise I’m off for vacation starting now!

* A note for when we get back: I don’t want to come home on the night of day 9 and have to run to the store to get food. I also don’t want to succumb to eating out. I’m thinking of making a freezer meal, but then I’d have to defrost it for awhile when we get home – we can’t really eat right away. I haven’t found the perfect solution to this yet… but I keep looking!

Traveling with Clean Food, Part 1: Pre-Planning

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It’s quite a food-centered week for the little blog! That’s no different than real life, though: food is on my mind ALL the time. I started cooking breakfast, lunch, and dinner for the fam a couple months ago, and when you spend a couple hours a day preparing, cooking, and serving food, it’s hard to get it off your mind.

My work up to this point has been fairly easy compared to what I’m tasked with right now, though. Normally I just plan meals for a week and figure out where to get what from all my new food sources. But now I’m preparing for some uncharted territory: traveling without sacrificing our good diet.

That’s because this summer we’re going on a vacation! A real, normal vacation that isn’t a obligatory visit – we actually chose to take this vacation! We’re going on a 10-day road trip across the Northwestern states: we start in Washington with a visit to Mt. St. Helens, drive through Northern Idaho, then the SW corner of Montana and into Yellowstone, Western Wyoming, Southern Idaho, up through Southeastern Oregon and back home. We’ll be on the move almost the whole time and we’ll see so much! I’m very excited to get off the beaten path for awhile and disconnect from modern life.

With that disconnect, though, comes concerns about food. Where will we eat? What will we eat? Will the food conform to my new standards of organic, non-GMO, local, pastured, etc? That has been on my mind a lot now that I’ve planned out where we’re going, what we’re seeing, and where we’re staying.

Never fear, though, we can make a plan! I’ve starting thinking up strategies and here’s what I’ve got so far.

  • First, since we’re camping most of the way, we have a location and equipment to make a lot of our own food. We always make our food when we’re camping, we will just have better ingredients this time!
  • Second, we can bring a lot of foods with us. I plan on making batches of muffins, cookies, and dehydrated snacks (fruit chips, fruit leather, kale chips, etc). I’ll freeze baked goods and pull them out periodically, or when they start to thaw. I’ll also have the cooler and dry storage bags packed with fresh things we can eat on the go like carrots, apples, and granola. I’m going to make some freezer meals, like camp fire stew, that I can hopefully just thaw and stick in my cast iron dutch oven to cook while we set up camp.
  • Third, since we can’t bring ALL our food (not if we want to have room for our tent and clothes too!) I’m finding local grocery stores, farmers markets, even farms along our route. Just about every town we’re visiting has a farmers market, but only one of the markets will be going on the day we’re in town (really excited to see the Coeur d’Alene, Idaho market though!).
  • Finally, I’m looking up restaurants. I don’t want to eat a lot of meals “out,” but we are meeting friends along our route and there will be times that we should treat ourselves. We are on vacation after all! If there’s a spot with a cool restaurant then we’re not going to deprive ourselves.

Hopefully these ideas will help keep us on track with healthy eating. Next on my list to do is the actual planning – what are we going to eat and when, where is it going to come from, all those questions need to have concrete answers before we can leave. We have two weeks to get everything together. I’ll post more when I have a meal plan!

Bringing Home the Bacon

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Ah, grocery shopping. Other than meal planning, is there anything more fun? Add in a toddler who MUST walk for herself through the entire store and you’ve got a load of entertainment, let me tell you!

We’ve been changing up our grocery shopping habits a lot in the last six months or so. Our baseline was your typical shopper, I think: we got most foods from a big grocery store like Safeway or Fred Meyer. We didn’t buy anything special, a fair mix of packaged foods and fresh produce. I didn’t care if things were organic or not, they just needed to look okay. We shopped a little at some smaller, locally owned grocery stores, too, but I hated going to more than one store for food.

Then when I found out about GMOs and started my New Years resolution to improve our diet, I started doing more shopping at Trader Joe’s and a couple really sweet local grocery stores. I tell you what, local grocery stores are where it’s at. If you’re lucky enough to have them close to you, check them out. Local grocery stores are where we’re getting the vast majority of our produce right now. It’s almost like a farmers market, because most of the foods are sourced locally, but they still have out-of-season foods like the grocery stores (like strawberries in January). It’s so much easier to find the organic produce at the smaller spots.

The farmers market, though… that’s where I’d love to get the bulk of our produce from. The local grocery stores just aren’t as “local” as the farmers market. The problem is I have to go by the market’s schedule. With the grocery store I can go whenever I want, but with the market I have to wait for the brief weekly window in which the farmers gather. I shouldn’t complain – here in my city there’s a farmers market five or six days of the week. But I still find it difficult to get there! And I have to plan meals more carefully and seasonally because the farmers markets don’t grow all our favorites year-round like the commercial growers. The third con on my list for farmers markers is the cost. Most of the time I don’t find them to be cheaper than the store (but Mr. Handsome is way more observant about prices than I am. I just look for what I need and buy it but he actually tries to stay within a budget. Imagine that!).

Speaking of seasonal produce, I’m in love with these seasonal charts. I want to print them out and hang them in my kitchen – both as art and as meal planning tools! Here’s the veggie chart.

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Moving on… so produce buying is sort of a balancing act between what is available and reasonably priced at the farmers market and all the choices but not quite as locally-sourced foods at the smaller grocery stores. There are some discount produce markets around here that are open all week and year-round – those are a good “in between” option. Another in-between’er is our food buying club.

We joined this club… it’s kind of a combination of group buying (where a bunch of people go in on a big buy of something like 50 pounds of honey or a whole cow), bulk buying like Azure, and farmer cooperative. We have been getting just about all of our meat through the co-op farmers and have had good luck with random boxes of veggies. I recently ordered 15 pounds of coconut oil that I plan to turn into more toothpaste (imagine that!), soap, hair products, and maybe even food. When we all had bad colds a few weeks ago we nursed them with a couple bottles of elderberry syrup that I got for a good price through the club. I’d love to start getting sundries from the club, too, but right now I still go to the big grocery store for toilet paper, dishwasher soap, vinegar, epsom salt, aluminum foil, and paper towels (we have used washable towels more lately, and I have some strategies to eliminate paper towels altogether, but I haven’t been able to implement them yet).

Now my shopping order goes something like this…

  1. Food buying club weekly for milk, eggs, cheese; monthly for meat, bulk staples, bulk produce like lemons, garlic, onion, potatoes.
  2. Farmers market weekly for seasonal veggies (if the price is right) and “craft” items like vegan chocolate.
  3. Discount produce market weekly for more seasonal veggies (that were too expensive at the farmers market).
  4. Local grocery stores weekly or every other week for produce we couldn’t find already.
  5. Trader Joe’s, if we have to, maybe once a month (we get plain Joe’s O’s for lazy breakfasts a couple times a month, beer/wine, flowers, and other random stuff at TJ’s like more chocolate).
  6. Big grocery stores for paper products, maybe once a month.

Yes, we go to more than one store to get our food now. But we don’t go to every place in one day and ask you can see we don’t even go to every place each week. I have been going to the club weekly but I’d love to cut down to every other week if it weren’t for the fresh milk that we need to get every week (Baby2 loves milk and Kiddo1 has even been on a bit of a milk kick lately). I went to Safeway last week for the first time in at least a month. I needed toilet paper. They laughed at my reusable bags. It’s a different world at those grocery stores for me anymore!

 

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